4th of October = the cinnamon bun’s day

There are as many perfect cinnamon bun recipes as there are Swedes who like to bake…. I personally like to add some vanilla to the dough and also the filling. I’ve posted my best recipe before, but I’ll do it again:

100-150 g melted butter (cooled)
5 dl milk (full-cream)
50 g yeast (if dry yeast is used it has to correspond with 50g fresh)
1 dl sugar, 1,5 tsp vanilla sugar, 0,5 tsp salt, 1-1,3 dl wheatflour

Add the milk to the butter and then let the yeast dissolve, mix everything but the salt and 4 dl of the flour. (Beat the dough for about 10 min. Add flour until the dough feels good and releases from the bowl a bit). Add the salt, work the dough for about a minute. Allow the dough to rise for 45-60 min.

Pour the dough onto a table (with some flour on), divide it into two halves). Flatten one half at a time and spread soft butter on it. Sprinkle sugar, cinnamon and vanilla sugar over (make sure it is covered).

If you want to make rolls just roll it up like a Swiss roll and cut pieces about one inch thick. Place them in paper cups (you can also put them on a bakning tray but they will be flatter and bigger then).

If you want buns just fold the dough once and then cut slices about an inch thick, cut each slice again but not all the way up so that it lookes a bit like a pair of pants. Twirl the two “legs” around eachother and then swing the bun together a bit like a knot. (Practise makes perfect).

Let them rise 40 min., brush with beaten egg and sprinkle with some sugar (big crystals).

Bake approx. 5-8 min. until dark golden brown, in 250 Celcius = 482 F

Time for apple pie 

Homegrown apples make the perfect pies! My favorite pie is the type with the typical Swedish “crumb” crust (although I really like the pie with crust and lid as well). Served with a thick rich custard, or vanilla ice cream.

For the crumble mix flour, oatmeal, butter, vanilla sugar and a little sugar. Mix it well and sprinkle it on top of the cut apples.

Add some cinnamon and maybe a bit of syrup on top. Then bake it!

The cinnamon roll’s day 4th of October

  
The recipe is the same as the one in the post called fika (it’s my absolute favorite though)

With this recipe you can bake your own delicious cinnamon buns (or rolls if you want that).

100-150 g melted butter (warm)

5 dl milk (full-cream)

50 g yeast (if dry yeast is used it has to correspond with 50g fresh)

1 dl sugar

1,5 tsp vanilla sugar

0,5 tsp salt

1-1,3 dl wheatflour

Add the milk to the butter and then let the yeast dissolve, mix everything but the salt and 4 dl of the flour. (Beat the dough for about 10 min. Add flour until the dough feels good and releases from the bowl a bit). Add the salt, work the dough for about a minute. Allow the dough to rise for 45-60 min.

Pour the dough onto a table (with some flour on), divide it into two halves). Flatten one half at a time and spread soft butter on it. Sprinkle sugar, cinnamon and vanilla sugar over (make sure it is covered).

If you want to make rolls just roll it up like a Swiss roll and cut pieces about three cm thick. Place them in paper cups (you can also put them on a bakning tray but they will be flatter and bigger then).

If you want buns just fold the dough once and then cut slices about three cm thick, cut each slice again but not all the way up so that it lookes a bit like a pair of pants. Twirl the two “legs” around eachother and then swing the bun together a bit like a knot. (Practise makes perfect).

Let them rise 40 min., brush with beaten egg and sprinkle with some sugar (big crystals).

Bake approx. 5-8 min. until dark golden brown, in 250 Celcius = 482 F

Mud cake “Kladdkaka” 

 
A very common and popular cake is the “kladdkaka” (directly translated it means sticky kake), it’s a type of brownie like mud cake and is super easy to bake.

Children as well as adults usually love it, and it can be made in many forms thick, thin or in cupcake form. Perfect served with whipped cream.

Basic recipe for my favorite

2 eggs (big or 3 small)

1 cup sugar 

3,5 oz(100g) butter

4 tbsp cocoa powder

3/4 cup wheat flour 

1/2 tsp baking powder

1 tsp vanilla sugar 

1 pinch salt

Beat the eggs and sugar and then add the rest. Pour into a tin 7 or 8 inches (the type where you can separate the bottom from the walls). And bake for about 20 minutes (depending on your oven), 392F (200C), it should not be fully set.

Swedish flatbread “tunnbröd”

  
 
My grandmother’s recipe 

4,2 cups (1 l) milk

3,5 oz (100g) butter

1,8 oz (50g) yeast 

2-5 tbsp light brown syrup (depending how sweet you want the bread)

0,5 tbsp salt

2/4 cup oatmeal 

0,6 oz (17g) hartshorn salt (powdered ammonium carbonate) / can be exchanged for baking soda the same amount or double the amount with baking powder)

35,2 oz (1 kg) sifted rye flour (add some and then stir then add some more etc.)

I don’t like to but you can always spice the bread a bit with cumin.

Heat milk, butter, syrup and salt to 98F (almost 37 C). Stir the yeast in and then add the oatmeal and the hartshorn salt, start adding the rye flour.

Let it rise for a while (at least 40 min), then pour the dough onto a table and work some wheat flour into the dough. Don’t overwork it! Divide the dough into the amount of flatbreads you want (all depending on size).

Roll them out (preferably with a striped rolling pin) about 0,04 inches (3 mm), and then pick them with a fork, bread pick (or the type of rolling pin with picks or squares on). This will prevent them from “poofing”.

You can bake them in the oven for a short while or on the grill (preferably on a pizza stone). If you want soft bread just until you get small bubbles and it’s still white but not raw, if you want hard bread let it bake a little bit longer. It bakes really fast so it’s easier if you are two, one doing the rolling and one in charge of the baking 😊

Enjoy with some butter or the spread of your choice. (You can freeze the soft bread, just make sure it thaws slowly and the hard can be stored for a long time in a breadbox).

Semla (Fat Tuesday bun)

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This “Semla” is a typical Swedish pastry eaten from the start of January (but 20-30 years ago they started selling it just a couple of days before Fat Tuesday -17 Feb.) and traditionally made until Easter.

The dough to make the bun is very similar to the cinnamon rolls/buns, but with more cardamom and it is traditionally formed like a bun/bread and baked. Then you slice the top off and fill it with an almond paste (a bit like a soft crude marzipan) and whipped cream, then the top is put back on and as a final touch you sprinkle some icing sugar over. The filling is always the same, but this year many bakeries have tried to be innovative and tried the “Semla” in different shapes like i.e. wrap, hot dog bun, the real one always wins though.

At the moment I am in NY so I guess I have to pay the café Fika a visit (even though I don’t think that all of their cookies and buns/rolls are very Swedish) and hope that they have a “Semla”. Or maybe IKEA will… 🙂

Blueberry pie

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Pie is something most Swedes like to bake/eat in summer. Especially now when many types of berries are ripe. Today my cousin walked in with a pint of blueberries and asked if I could make a pie. Since I am fond of both blueberries and pie I said yes!!

The most common type of pie is crumble, it is also very easy to do. I didn’t want the ordinary crumble today so I used ground almonds instead of wheatflour, and added some oatflakes (to get a bit of crunch), vanilla sugar, butter and also a little bit of roasted oatflour.

The roasted oatflour is called “skrädmjöl” and is very special for the county “Värmland”, it is used in many different types of bread and cakes but the most famous thing with this flour must be the “nävgröt” (= fist porrige, because you ate it with your hand) or “Motti o fläsk” which basically is a lumpy (dry) porrige that you serve with unsmoked fried bacon and lingonberry jam (you also pour some of the frying fat over the food to make it less dry). Despite the sound of this the dish is actually really good.

And so was the pie I made! 🙂

“Fika” = have a coffee

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Swedes are well known for their “fika”, there is even a coffee shop in New York named Fika (I heard from others that the only Swedish thing there was the foto wallpaper with a view over Stockholm. The coffee tasted like any other American coffee and the cinnamon roll was big and dry. Why would I want to go there when I can find a Starbucks in every other corner). 😉

Any way, Swedes are very fond of buns and rolls filled with cinnamon, vanilla, pistachio, apples….
It is very traditional and common to have some kind of bun when you invite someone for a cup of coffee “fika”, and you can find them in every bakery and coffee shop in Sweden (they even sell them in gas stations).

With this recipe you can bake your own delicious cinnamon buns (or rolls if you want that).
100-150 g melted butter (warm)
5 dl milk (full-cream)
50 g yeast (if dry yeast is used it has to correspond with 50g fresh)
1 dl sugar
1,5 tsp vanilla sugar
0,5 tsp salt
1-1,3 dl wheatflour

Add the milk to the butter and then let the yeast dissolve, mix everything but the salt and 4 dl of the flour. (Beat the dough for about 10 min. Add flour until the dough feels good and releases from the bowl a bit). Add the salt, work the dough for about a minute. Allow the dough to rise for 45-60 min.
Pour the dough onto a table (with some flour on), divide it into two halves). Flatten one half at a time and spread soft butter on it. Sprinkle sugar, cinnamon and vanilla sugar over (make sure it is covered).

If you want to make rolls just roll it up like a Swiss roll and cut pieces about three cm thick. Place them in paper cups (you can also put them on a bakning tray but they will be flatter and bigger then).
If you want buns just fold the dough once and then cut slices about three cm thick, cut each slice again but not all the way up so that it lookes a bit like a pair of pants. Twirl the two “legs” around eachother and then swing the bun together a bit like a knot. (Practise makes perfect).

Let them rise 40 min., brush with beaten egg and sprinkle with some sugar (big crystals).
Bake approx. 5-8 min. until dark golden brown, in 250 Celcius = 482 F (according to Google).

Enjoy!